How to Get the Most From Your Yoga (Warrior 2), Pt. 1


Mar 7, 2022

 by Brian Friedman
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I get asked a lot ... "How is the yoga at Winter Garden Yoga different from other methods?"
 
It's a simple question that's not super easy to explain.
 
We teach yoga in the safest most effective way possible getting you the most benefit from each and every pose. And we do this by focusing on muscles and mobility vs. momentum and flexibility.
 
I'll do my best to show you.
 
Let's take a look at this photo.
 
 
It's a pose called Warrior 2. And the way it's being demonstrated is pretty typical of most yoga providers.
 
The goal of Warrior 2 is to bring symmetry to the hips, tone the legs, tone the core, tone the glutes, tone the arms, and strengthen habits of good posture.
 
First, the good stuff ... the stance is wide enough, the arms are engaged, and the shoulders are down and away from the ears.
 
However - - there are a lot of benefits being missed which could lead to ... let's just say, a lot of wasted time, and a lot of frustration.
 
Now, let's see where there are missed opportunities.
 
The feet. The rear foot is set in a way that the ankle is collapsing. This makes the entire structure less secure and could lead to issues running up the entire leg (ankle, knees, hips, low back).
 
The front foot is "okay" but could use a little more lift in the arch.
 
The hips are uneven a rotated slightly toward the front foot. This adds to the instability of the pose and forces the spine to tilt toward the front leg (think, "Leaning Tower of Pisa") and ...
 
it deprives the inner thighs of being "stretched", plus it robs both glutes from being activated and toned.
 
Lastly, you'll notice that the "energy" is shifting forward, forcing the front leg to take the brunt of the entire body's weight. This leads to fatigue and may accelerate wear-and-tear on the front knee.
 
The good news?
 
There's a safer way to get the most perks from this classic asana.
 
Shall I show you how?
 
Tune in next time and I'll take you through it step-by-step.
 
All the best, 
 
Brian