The Quickest Reset (Good For Your Posture)

 

The Quickest Reset (Good For Your Posture)

Want to try a quick reset?

The first time I heard the term “reset” came from Tim Anderson’s excellent book, Original Strength.

Tim was inspired by watching his son develop the ability to move.

He watched as his son learned to lift his head, then roll across the ground, get to all fours, crawl, and so on. And what Anderson realized was, as adults, we lose these fundamental movement patterns as we get older and more sedentary.

Think about it … when was the last time you crawled on all fours?

As we lose these abilities we fall victim to poor posture, loss of coordination, and core strength.

If you want to see how tough babies work on a daily basis try behaving like a newborn for 30 minutes.

Lie on your belly only lifting your head to see what’s going on, then rolling from side to side to get from place to place, and finally commando crawling on your belly from one end of your house to the other … you’ll be spent.

But you’ll also increase your strength, increase your mobility, and have a strong midsection. All of which lead to good posture and increased functional capacity.

Here’s the good news. You can acquire some of the benefits of a postural reset without crawling around.

You can do it all day, throughout the day, as needed. And it’s easy.

Would you like to see?

Try This

Stand with your back a few inches away from a wall.

Now, gently step backward until your heels, buttocks, and shoulder blades touch the wall.

Don’t try to be “perfect.” Try to be as honest as possible to assess your posture.

How far away from the wall is your skull?

Do you feel tight?

Get an overall feeling of this “before” data.

Now Do This

Take a few steps away from the wall.

Stand as straight as possible.

Now, without arching your back, slowly begin to look toward the ceiling.

You’re trying to press your nose into the ceiling.

Don’t let your head just flop back. Use your muscles to lift your face up and tilt your head back.

Keep your teeth closed together. Breathe in and out through your nose.

Double check to make sure you’re not arching your back. You can place your hands on the bottom of your rib cage to check yourself.

Work on this for about 30 seconds.

Don’t strain. Make sure everything feels okay.

Gently look forward.

Winter Garden Yoga shares a quick reset for your posture.

Try to keep yourself fairly upright when you perform this reset. Do your best to resist leaning backwards.

Try Again

Stand with your back a few inches away from a wall.

Now, gently step backward until your heels, buttocks, and shoulder blades touch the wall.

Don’t try to be “perfect.” Try to be as honest as possible to assess your posture.

Did your head make it to the wall this time?

Did it feel easier? Less stiff?

Make It A Habit

I do my best to use this reset every time I get up from my desk.

I’m just like a lot of people in that I sit behind a computer for long stretches of time.

It happens.

The key is to un-do what you do with postural resets, walking, joint mobility, yoga, and just staying active.

You’ve got a quick an easy reset in your toolbox.

Make a commitment to start using it today.

You’ve got this!

Brian Friedman
Owner/Director
WinterGardenYoga.com

PS: If you want to try some other resets, check out these free videos …

Soft Rolling Pattern

Quadruped (aka Bird Dog)

Neck Nodding

 

 

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